7-Day Low-Carb Sugar Detox Meal Plan to Fight Weight Gain, Type 2 Diabetes

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Low carb diets come in many colors, flavors, and popular names! The Atkins, Ketogenic, and other low-carb-high-fat diets are all example of low carb diets. This type of diet, as stated in its name, limits the amount of carbohydrates you eat, usually to ~50g of carbohydrates per day.[1] They’re often replaced with foods that are high in healthy fats and protein, although the ratios vary from diet to diet and person to person – because not single diet fits all!

People usually adopt low carb diets for varying periods of time to lose weight, but they have also proven to be beneficial for fighting against type 2 diabetes and obesity.[1] However, it is never easy to change eating habits, especially ones that were formed years ago. And you’re not alone – cutting down or even eliminating sugar and other carbohydrates is not easy…

For that reason, our in-house nutritionist has put together a simple, manageable, and delicious 7-day sugar detox meal plan along with foods, snacks, sweeteners, and beverages to embrace and avoid!

Your 7-Days Sugar Detox Meal Plan

Monday

Breakfast: Organic and/or grass-fed Greek yogurt with 1/2 cup blueberries and walnuts (0.5-1oz) with dash of cinnamon

Lunch: Salmon salad (with spinach)

Dinner: Grilled Chicken with asparagus made with coconut oil or grass-fed butter

Tuesday

Breakfast: 2 Egg Omelette with asparagus (perhaps from night before) made with grass-fed butter

Lunch: Smokey tempeh and avocado salad on spinach

Dinner: Grass-fed steak and low carb veggies

Wednesday

Breakfast: 2 Egg Omelette with spinach made with grass-fed butter

Lunch: Organic and/or grass-fed Greek yogurt with 1/2 cup cherries and almonds (0.5-1oz) with dash of cinnamon

Dinner: Wild salmon cooked with avocado oil or grass-fed butter served with low carb veggies

Thursday

Breakfast: Smoothie: Coconut milk, some cashews, blue berries, low carb protein powder. Natural low carb sweetened to taste

Lunch: Roasted chicken salad

Dinner: Smokey Tempe steak with sliced avocado over cauliflower rice

Friday

Breakfast: 2 Egg Omelette with broccoli made with grass-fed butter

Lunch: Smoothie: Coconut milk, some almonds, raspberries, low carb protein powder. Natural low carb sweetened to taste

Dinner: Turkey sausage (with no bun) and broccoli, feta, and olives

Saturday

Breakfast: Organic and/or grass-fed Greek yogurt with 1/2 cup apricot halves and cashews (0.5-1oz) with dash of cinnamon

Lunch: Turkey sausage (from dinner) with low carb coleslaw

Dinner: Pork chop with grilled veggies

Sunday

Breakfast: Organic nitrite-free pemeal bacon and eggs

Lunch: Roasted chicken salad

Dinner: Meatballs over cauliflower rice

What else can I eat on a low-carb diet?

Restrictive diets may feel limiting (and they are for your own good), but you can actually still enjoy delicious foods while getting healthier! Here’s a clear guide to the yay’s and nay’s of low-carb foods.[2]

Low-Carb Foods to Eat

  • Healthy oils and fats (fish, olive, coconut, butter, lard)
  • Certain dairy products (high-fat yogurt, heavy cream, butter, cheese)
  • Eggs (pastured, omega-3-enriched ones)
  • Fruits (blueberries, strawberries, oranges, apples, pears)
  • Vegetables (carrots, cauliflower, spinach, broccoli)
  • Grass-fed meat (chicken, beef, lamb, pork)
  • Wild-caught fish (salmon, haddock, trout)

Low Carb Foods to Avoid

  • Sugar
  • Trans fats
  • Low-fat diet products
  • Highly processed foods
  • Refined grains
  • Starch-rich vegetables[3]

How to Snack on a Low-Carb Diet

If you’re a snack person, have no fear. You’ll find that this list of low-carb snacks is not as disappointing as you would think.[2]

Eat this: A piece of one of the fruits listed above, a handful of nuts, some grass-fed meat and cheese, a small bowl of full-fat yogurt, a couple of hard-boiled eggs, or leftovers!

Not that: Basically, any snack foods that look like they’ve gone through a factory. This includes chips, ice cream, and even some surprising “healthy” snacks.

Do you use sweeteners? Keep reading…

On a low-carb diet, you have to realize and understand that sugar is sugar at the end of the day. So, if you can’t part with your sweetness, it’s really a matter of consuming the best possible sugar possible.

Sweeteners to Avoid

  • Anything ending in -ose (e.g., glucose, fructose, maltose, dextrose)
  • Most sugar alcohols (e.g., sorbitol, mannitol)
  • Honey
  • Maple syrup
  • Agave
  • Simple syrup
  • Table sugar
  • Coconut sugar
  • Cane sugar[4]

The Better Sweetening Options

  • Pure stevia
  • Monk fruit
  • Erythritol
  • *Xylitol[3]

*However, xylitol contains some calories and has been known to cause gastrointestinal discomfort, so it’s best to use this alternative in moderation.[5]

See? It’s not so bad!

There are still quite a few things you can eat – but how about what you can drink? Coca Cola ads do an excellent job of aligning their product with having a great life, but it’s doing anything but that! Sodas and other sugar-filled drinks are actually doing terrible things to your health.

So, here’s what you should avoid:

  • Any drinks with added sugars
  • Fruit juices
  • Colas
  • Sodas

Drink these beverages instead:[2]

  • Any drinks naturally containing zero calories (i.e., no sugar) such as club soda
  • Some sparkling waters (e.g., Perrier)
  • Coffee
  • Tea (e.g., black, green, herbal)
  • Plain water

How should I order if I’m eating at restaurants?

True – it can be challenging to order a truly low-carb meal if you’re eating out. You can start by ordering meat or fish, requesting any sauces to come on the side. As for the side dishes, substitute them for any of the veggies listed above or a salad with olive oil for dressing. As for beverages, hold off on the alcohol and order sparkling water instead. You may need to sacrifice dessert, too. (Sorry!)

Read More: Why Doctors Are Recommending Low-Carb, High-Fat Diets to Burn Fat Like Crazy and Help Prevent Cancer

Low-Carb Plans Are Not for Everyone

While they can be extremely beneficial for some people, not everyone needs to go on a low-carb diet. Like we mentioned at the top, going low-carb can be great for weight loss and reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Other people do it simply because it makes them feel better and less sluggish.

If you’re wondering whether a low-carb diet is for you, try out this meal plan for a week! Or, visit your personal health care provider to discuss whether it would be beneficial for you to try it out.

[1] Can a low-carb diet help you lose weight? (2017, August 29). Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/weight-loss/in-depth/low-carb-diet/art-20045831

[2] A Low-Carb Diet Meal Plan and Menu That Can Save Your Life. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/low-carb-diet-meal-plan-and-menu#shopping-list

[3] 14 Foods to Avoid (or Limit) on a Low-Carb Diet. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/14-foods-to-avoid-on-low-carb#section1

[4] S. (2018, June 24). Complete Guide To Sweeteners on a Low-carb Ketogenic Diet | KetoDiet Blog. Retrieved from https://ketodietapp.com/Blog/lchf/Top-10-Natural-Low-carb-Sweeteners

[5] Storey, D., Lee, A., Bornet, F., & Brouns, F. (2006, September 20). Gastrointestinal tolerance of erythritol and xylitol ingested in a liquid. Retrieved from https://www.nature.com/articles/1602532

Image Sources:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeepersmedia/16385231822

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