Flowers and Plants You Can Grow in October

broccoli plant

As summer winds to an end and autumn is fast approaching, most of us are thinking about harvesting rather than planting. Luckily, there are still plenty of plants you can grow in October to keep on flexing your green thumb even as the weather gets cooler.

Plants You Can Grow in October

Not all plants aren’t meant to be planted and grown in the springtime. In this category of plants, you can grow in October, there are both flowers and decorative plants as well as vegetables. Some of these are plants that will bloom in the colder months, others are ones that you will plant in the fall to allow them months of root development before they bloom in the spring. Either way, they will keep your gardening itch scratched. (1)

You’ll need to know what gardening zone you are in to know which plants will thrive and which won’t. To discover your gardening zone, click here for the United States and here for Canada.

Read: 10 vegetables you can buy once and regrow forever!

Flowers You Can Plant in October

This is the time when you want to plant wildflowers, spring-blooming bulbs, and more. In fact, many of them benefit from time spent under the ground at the cooler temperatures. For all of these, make sure you wait until it is now warmer than 60 degrees Fahrenheit to plant these. (1)

1. Amaryllis

  • Zones 9 to 11, zone 8 with winter protection.
  • Loamy soil
  • Full or partial sun, some shade needed at sun peak
  • Flower 6 weeks after planting
  • Blossom from December to June
  • If planted in October, will plant in time for Christmas (1)

2. Aster

  • Zones 3 to 8
  • Loamy soil
  • Full or partial sun (1)

3. Autumn Crocus/Saffron Crocus

  • Zones 3 to 8
  • Must stay between 35 and 45 degrees Fahrenheit for 12 to 15 weeks in order to flower
  • Any soil type
  • Full sun or light shade (1)

4. Baboon Flower/Blue Freesia

  • Zones 9 to 10
  • Moist, well-draining soil
  • Full sun or light shade
  • Blossoms 10 to 12 weeks after bulbs are planted (1)

5. Carnation

  • Zones 3 to 10 (variety dependent)
  • Slightly alkaline (pH 6.75), fertile, well-draining soil
  • 4 to 5 hours of daily sunshine
  • Bloom one to two years after seeds are planted (1)

6. Cornflower

  • Zones 2 to 11
  • Full sun
  • Slightly alkaline soil (pH 7.2 to 7.8)
  • Can grow in fertile standard, poor, or rocky soil (1)

7. Forget-Me-Not

  • Plant them now to have a full-looking garden early in the springtime (1)

8. Goldenrod

  • Zones 3 to 9
  • Full sun or part shade (1)

9. Hyacinth

  • Zones 4 to 9
  • Full sun or partial shade
  • Fertile, well-draining soil
  • Flowers bloom 3 weeks after leaves appear (1)

10. Ice Plant

  • Zones 8 to 10
  • Full sun
  • Can bloom in temperatures below freezing
  • Can be found in Zones 4 to 9 (1)

11. Larkspur

  • Zones 3 to 8
  • Thrives in light soil with ample drainage but can grow in most
  • Full sun or partial shade
  • Blooms will appear in the spring (1)

12. Marigold

  • Zones 3 to 9 (1)

13. Poppies

  • Three varieties: annual, California, and Oriental (1)

14. Tulips

  • Zones 4 to 6 (1)

Read: Eggshells in the Garden: 5 Ways They’ll Help You Grow Food

Other optional flowers to grow in October (1):

  • Cockscomb
  • Common daisy
  • Dogtooth
  • Fritillaria
  • Giant allium
  • Glory-of-the-snow
  • Hawksbeard
  • Hellebore
  • Hollyhock
  • Iris
  • Leather flower
  • Lupine
  • Pansy
  • Peony
  • Petunia
  • Pinks
  • Poached eggplant
  • Primrose
  • Siberian squill
  • Snowdrop
  • Snapdragon
  • Stock
  • Summer snowflake
  • Sweet pea
  • Sweet william
  • Wallflower
  • Watsonia
  • Winter aconite

Other Plants

There are plenty of landscaping plants, herbs, shrubs, trees, roses, cover crops, and herbs you can also grow in October. Again, check your zone, estimated freezing date, and instructions for each plant to know whether or not it can be left outside in the cold. (1)

Read: Gardening Experts Say You Should Always Plant Flowers in Your Vegetable Patch

Vegetables You Can Grow in October

If growing food is more your thing than flowers and decorative plants than there are plenty of vegetables to plant in October that will also keep you busy. (2)

1. Arugula

  • Zones 3 to 11, best in zones 8+
  • Full sun
  • 45-60 days to harvest
  • Plant every 2-3 weeks for continuous harvest (2)

2. Asparagus

  • Zones 4 to 9
  • Full sun
  • Sandy soil
  • 2 to 3 years for full production (2)

3. Artichoke

  • Zones 7 to 11 as perennial, colder zones grow as an annual
  • 110-150 days to maturity (2)

4. Beets

  • Zones 9+
  • Loamy or sandy soil
  • Full or part sun
  • 45-65 days to harvest
  • Plant every 20 days for continuous harvest (2)

5. Bok Choy

  • Zones 4 to 7, undercover
  • Prefers partial shade, full sun is okay
  • 30 days for baby bok choy, 120 to 180 days for standard (2)

6. Broccoli

  • Zones 3 to 10
  • Sandy soil
  • Full sun
  • Use transplants for October planting
  • 55 to 80 days to harvest (2)

7. Broad Bean

  • Excellent to 14 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Protect with fleece during snowstorms of hard frost
  • 240 days to harvest (2)

8. Brussels Sprouts

  • Zones 2 to 9
  • Full sun
  • Loamy soil
  • 80+ days to harvest (2)

9. Cabbage

  • Zones 1 to 9
  • Full sun
  • 80 to 180 days to harvest (2)

10. Carrots

  • Zones 3 to 10
  • Full sun
  • 60 to 120 days to harvest
  • Plant every 3 weeks for continuous harvest (2)

11. Cauliflower

  • Can grow as long as temperatures are in the 60s
  • As the plant matures, use a cold frame until spring
  • Only plant when the temperature is below 75 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Full sun, shade from heat as needed (2)

12. Corn salad/Lamb’s lettuce

  • Zones 5+
  • Once the plant is 4 inches tall, harvest 2 to 3 leaves daily
  • 120 days to harvest (2)

13. Collard greens

  • Zones 8+
  • Plant 3 feet apart
  • Full sun, hot areas partial shade
  • 60-75 days to harvest (2)

14. Cucumber

  • Zones 4 to 11
  • Loamy soil
  • Full sun
  • 50 to 70 days to harvest (2)

15. Garlic

  • Zones 3 to 8
  • Full sun
  • Loamy soil (2)

16. Kale

  • Good to 20 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Full sun
  • Loamy soil
  • 55 days if transplanting to harvest, 70 to 80 from seeds
  • Plant every 3 weeks for continuous harvest (2)

17. Kohlrabi

  • Best between 40 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Can tolerate an early fall frost
  • 45 to 60 days to maturity (2)

18. Leek

  • Zones 7+
  • 120 to 170 days to harvest, depending on if they are short or long-season leeks (2)

19. Lettuce

  • Zones 3 to 9
  • Select loose-leaf varieties (2)

20. Mustard greens

  • Zones 8 to 11
  • Can begin harvest at 120 days, full maturity at 180 (2)

21. Onions

  • Zones 3 to 9
  • Full sun varieties
  • Choose long-day varieties (2)

22. Parsnip

  • Zones 2 to 9
  • Loamy or sandy soil
  • Full or partial sun
  • Cover with mulch in the winter
  • 480 days to harvest
  • Harvest before ground freezes (2)

23. Peas

  • Zones 2 to 9
  • Plant 6 to 8 weeks before the first frost
  • Full or partial sun
  • In snow or hard frost protect plants with fleece (2)

24. Potato

  • Good in most growing zones
  • 120-135 days to harvest
  • Harvest 2 to 3 weeks after foliage has died black
  • Plant late-season varieties (2)

25. Radish

  • Zones 3 to 9
  • 30 days to harvest (2)

26. Rhubarb

  • Zone 6 and cooler (2)

27. Rutabaga

  • Zones 3 to 9
  • Loamy soil
  • Full sun
  • 80 to 100 days to harvest (2)

28. Shallot

  • Zones 4 to 10
  • Best in full sun, partial sun okay
  • Plant 2 to 4 weeks before the first frost
  • 90 to 180 days to harvest (2)

29. Spinach

  • Zones 3 to 9
  • Plant every few weeks for a continuous harvest
  • Protect with fleece
  • 37 to 45 days to harvest (2)

30. Spring Onion

  • Zones 5 to 9
  • 240 days to harvest (2)

31. Summer Squash

  • Zones 3 to 10
  • Average harvest time is 60 days
  • Harvest between 4 and 6 inches long for tender, tasty fruits (2)

32. Swiss Chard

  • Zones 3 to 10
  • Full or partial sun
  • Plant 40 days before the first frost
  • 30 days for baby greens, 45 to 60 days for mature greens (2)

33. Turnip

  • Zone 9 and 10
  • Best-tasting when harvested when bulbs are between 2 and 3 inches in diameter (2)

Clearly there are so many options for plants you can grow in October, so there’s no reason to mourn the end of the spring and summer season. Happy gardening!

Keep Reading: 5 Cheap Gardening Tricks for Self-Reliance

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