Yellow brick road discovered at bottom of ocean as deep-sea researchers stumble on site

While exploring Hawaii the crew of Exploration Vessel Nautilus spotted the unusual rock formation which looks similar to a mythical man-made yellow brick road

Deep-sea researchers have discovered a yellow brick road at the bottom of the ocean
Deep-sea researchers have discovered a yellow brick road at the bottom of the ocean

A group of deep-sea researchers have stumbled across a yellow brick road at the bottom of the ocean.

The crew of Exploration Vessel Nautilus came across the unusual formation which bears a resemblance appearance to a mythical man-made road in Hawaii.

However, the yellow brick road appears to be an example of ancient active volcanic geology.

The unique and fascinating geological formations were discovered by the explorers while diving on the Liliʻuokalani Ridge within Papahānaumokuakea Marine National Monument.

Spotting a dried lake bed at the summit of Nootka Seamount, they’ve now identified the yellow brick road as a fractured flow of hyaloclastite rock.







The yellow brick road to the mythical city of Atlantis is really an example of ancient active volcanic geology
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Image:

Ocean Exploration Trust/NOAA)

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This is essentially a volcanic rock formed in high-energy eruptions where many rock fragments settle to the seabed).

The unique 90-degree fractures are likely related to heating and cooling stress from multiple eruptions at this baked margin.

Throughout the seamount chain, the team also sampled basalts coated with ferromanganese (iron-manganese) crusts from across different depths and oxygen saturations as well as an interesting-looking pumice rock that almost resembled a sponge.”

This observation was made during Ocean Exploration Trust’s Expedition NA138 to explore the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM), in partnership with the NOAA Ocean Exploration and the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries.

An E/V Nautilus spokesperson adds: “Our exploration of this never-before-surveyed area is helping researchers take a deeper look at life on and within the rocky slopes of these deep, ancient seamounts.

These studies will help provide baseline information on the living communities of seamounts which can inform management and conservation measures.







The crew of Exploration Vessel Nautilus spotted the incredible rock formation while exploring in Hawaii
(

Image:

Ocean Exploration Trust/NOAA)

This isn’t the only unusual thing that’s been spotted in the sea recently as at least 50 hungry sharks circling in the shallow water off the US coast.

A clip, that was shared by The Pasco County Sheriff’s Office in Florida, was posted online to warn people of the dangers that lurk within the sea.

Alongside the video, the post reads: “A day in the water is a fun way to beat our Florida heat, but it’s important to be aware of the dangers below the water as well as above.”

Shark researcher, Jack Morris, said that the blacktip sharks were gathered due to their annual migration journey north.

He also warned swimmers that the sharks could misidentify them as surfers who they’ve been known to bite.

However, trying to break the dangerous stigma of sharks, professional shark diver Kayleigh Nicole Grant says that the creatures are incredibly shy and wary of human contact.

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